Get Your Freezers Ready!!

It’s almost time! We’re scheduled to go to the butcher’s on December 7th. This means two very important things:

  1. ) If you placed an order, you need to make sure you have a big enough freezer for all that beef!
  2. ) Believe it or not, we still have a VERY small amount left so it’s not too late to put in your order, but you better do it quickly. By quickly I mean, like, this week ūüôā

So let’s revisit what size freezer you need. We recommend the following:

  • Whole order: 15 cubic feet
  • Half Order: 7.5 cubic feet
  • Quarter Order: 5 cubic feet

These are approximate sizes. Typically, most people seem to agree, but this can fluctuate based on the final size of your order. Also keep in mind that once you have this extra freezer you may want to store other items in it! So a little extra room might not be a bad thing.

What to look for:

This is obviously a personal choice but nowadays there are tons of cool features (pun not intended) you can get. Frost-free is a good option as it will prevent frost buildup: an important step in avoiding freezer burn. There are even some with locks to keep it child-proof or away from any nosy, hungry individuals.

Energy efficient, LED lit, adjustable temperature dials…There’s something for everyone. A good place to start is simply what style do you want? An upright freezer will function much like a refrigerator you’re used to, with a few shelves, possible door space, and a swing door. A chest freezer is like a treasure chest. The lid opens from the top to reveal something better than gold…

There are a few differences between these two, mostly being space related. An upright has more organization abilities with it’s shelves, takes up less room itself, and is easier to get things out of. I’ve also read, though, that they don’t last as long as your average chest freezer and aren’t as energy-efficient. A chest freezer is typically deeper, making it a lot easier to store large, whole items. However, it also means you may be searching around a bit more for what you need and you may have to reach farther to get items from the bottom.

Either way, these are both better options than a regular refrigerator freezer because there is enough space and it won’t be opened nearly as much, keeping that cold air from escaping and food spoiling quicker.

Where do you buy your freezer?

Luckily, you can find these things everywhere. Every major appliance store carries them. You can even find a small selection at wholesale stores like Sam’s Club or Costco! You may also get lucky on Craigslist, Facebook Market, Letgo, and other secondhand websites/apps. Just keep in mind you may be getting what you pay for.

Lastly, the price:

A 5-6 cubic foot freezer can cost anywhere from $100 to about $250, 7-8 cubic feet is around $250 to $500, and anything from 9-16 cubic feet could be anywhere from $500 to $800. Of course, this all varies between what kind and other specs.

Comment below or fill out the contact form if you have ANY questions at all about freezers and storing beef!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recipe of the Month: Meatloaf

Agh!¬† I am so sorry, readers! I admit I have failed a bit and got a little behind with the recipes. To make matters worse, I don’t have pictures to share. I’ve been busy working on other exciting things for Grant Creek and let things slip a little. I’m going to justify it by saying this month was obviously taken up by Thanksgiving, so all of you have been preoccupied with other delicious foods.

I can’t believe it’s already almost Christmas! It’s definitely starting to feel like it outside. Cold weather automatically demands comfort foods and I got to thinking, what exactly constitutes a comfort food? Obviously that depends on who you are and where you’re from, I suppose. I often think of carb-loaded, cheesy, creamy, and fried foods – all with a side of bread. That could be because I grew up in the south (Technically, I don’t think Oklahoma is considered the south) but I’ve never heard a salad described as a comfort food by literally anyone. Wikipedia describes it as something that provides nostalgia – whether specific to a person or culture.

It’s not on my personal comfort food list but I know it is for many and it’s taking things down a notch from the hectic Thanksgiving cooking. This month’s recipe is meatloaf. While I have always found the name to be very unappetizing (a loaf of meat?), I can promise you this meatloaf is one of the best. It was shared with me by my wonderful mother-in-law who is allowing me to share it with all of you!

I was just talking to a co-worker this morning about the differences in recipes between my family and in-laws. I have noticed they make a lot of their foods sweeter. Deviled eggs, beans and cornbread, meatloaf. They all have a sweeter touch on my husband’s side than what I grew up with, but don’t let that fool you. I’m definitely the sweeter one. OK, just kidding. Anyway, I don’t always agree this is an improvement, but it without a doubt makes this meatloaf a winner. Instead of brown gravy or simple tomato sauce on top we’re going to make a sweet sauce using ketchup and brown sugar – sounds weird, tastes delicious. Here’s what you’ll need!

Ingredients:

  • 2 lbs¬†ground beef
  • 1¬†onion – chopped
  • 1¬†green bell pepper – chopped
  • 1 sleeve of saltine crackers – crushed (fun fact: you can use crushed pork rinds for this step for a lower carb alternative!)
  • 1¬†egg
  • 1¬†squirt of mustard
  • Ketchup
  • Brown Sugar
  • Salt/Pepper to taste

Get Cooking:

  • Mix the beef, chopped onion, bell pepper, crushed crackers, egg, salt and pepper until well combined.
  • Form into a loaf and place in a greased 5 X 9 loaf pan. You can also use a larger baking dish or even smaller mini loaves. Keep in mind the size will determine how long it takes to cook.
  • Mix brown sugar and ketchup, adding a squirt of mustard, until you reach a desired sweetness. You will need about a cup.
  • Pour the mixture over the meatloaf.
  • Bake in the oven at 350 degrees for about 45 minutes – or until it is done all the way through.

I served mine with a loaded baked potato and green beans. Some of my favorite sides. For a less heavy meal you can always go with a side salad or grilled veggies. Comment below and let us know what you think of this recipe and what some of your favorite comfort foods are!

Recipe of the Month: Wine-Marinated Pot Roast

FALL IS HERE!! This is my season. I’ve seen posts all over social media begging Fall to make it’s official appearance. Unfortunately if you’re familiar with Oklahoma weather you know how it likes to tease us. We had a beautiful week awhile back. High temperatures were in the mid 80s, there was a slight cool breeze. You better believe I was full speed into Fall mode. Sadly, the 90s visited again and everyone had retreated back inside. Fortunately for us, I think it may be back and here to stay. I knew tempting Fall with our posts about pumpkin spice and hay bales would bribe it come a little early. So doing my part to make this last I’m going to jump in with a delicious recipe I found on Midwest Living’s website.

Before I get started, I want to give a shout out to my friend and fellow blogger, Samantha, for letting me take advantage of her beautiful kitchen as well as lending her awesome photography skills. I only had to bribe her with free dinner and my company ūüėČ Go check out her website at www.geekedable.com for all things geeky and enjoy the upgrade from my usual recipe posts!

Delicious Grass-Fed Dinner

To start off our seasonal recipes, we’re going to use a beef chuck roast. This is another versatile cut that is perfect for roasts or stew which means a lot of savory crock pot meals. We won’t actually be using a crock pot for this dish however. It is a bit more involved and “fancier” than our other recipes. It should be fun!

Marinated Roast

The recipe will need a lot of time and dedication. It calls for marinating the chuck roast for 8-24 hours along with about 3-4 hours cooking time with some work in between. I don’t know about you but marinating is one of those things I get really excited to see in a recipe. I know there is debate about lengths of time to marinate meat, if longer than a certain time frame really makes that much of a difference, but I always feel like the meal is bound to be excellent if it takes a whole day to make. Really, marinating is not something I think to do often and only do it if I see it in a recipe rather than on my accord. I’m such an “out of the box” thinker, right? So pour yourself a glass of wine, bring the rest with you, and let’s get started!

Ingredients:

  • One 3-3 1/2 lb boneless chuck arm or shoulder pot roast
  • One 750ml Bottle¬†fruity red wine (such as Cabernet, Sauvignon, Red Zinfandel or Merlot)
  • 1/2 Tsp kosher, sea salt or regular salt
  • 1/2 Tsp ground black pepper
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil or vegetable oil
  • One 10 1/2oz Can¬†condensed beef broth
  • 1/4 Cup¬†no salt added tomato paste
  • 1 Tbsp¬†Dijon-style mustard
  • 1 Tbsp¬†Herbes de Provence, fine herbes or Italian seasoning, crushed
  • 3 Cloves garlic, chopped
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 large onion, cut into thin wedges
  • 4 medium carrots, peeled, cut in half lengthwise, and halved crosswise (or 2 cups packaged peeled fresh baby carrots)
  • 4¬†medium parsnips, peeled and cut into 2-inch pieces or 4 medium potatoes, peeled and cut lengthwise into sixths
  • 2 Cups whole fresh cremini mushrooms
  • 2¬†stalks celery, bias-sliced into 1-inch pieces
  • Hot cooked noodles (optional)
  • 2 Tbsp¬†snipped Italian (flat-leaf) parsley
  • Baguette-style French bread, cut into 1-1/2 inch slices (optional)

Roast Ingredients

For the detailed cooking instructions I’m going to direct you to Midwest Living’s recipe directly. They were so generous to let me share this with you! Keep reading below to follow my adventure with it. Trust me, this is a recipe you want to try.

Wine and friendship makes cooking so much more exciting. This may have to become a monthly tradition. With my ingredients and pre-marinated chuck roast in tow I headed to Sam’s house ready to get cooking and dream of the Fall days upon us.

Peachy Canyon Red Zinfandel

Sadly, I’m not a wine connoisseur. When looking at the recommendations on the ingredient list I singled out the red zinfandel. I thought,¬†I like white so I’ll probably like red too, right? Yes, that is how my mind works. Picking the first bottle I found I ended up with this 2015 California Zinfandel from Peachy Canyon. When drinking I tend to select sweeter wines but this was yummy and worked perfectly for the recipe. I tell you what, that roast looked amazing just after marinating it. Did you see that deep red color??

Reserving the wine used to marinate the beef, I made a fragrant wine base with garlic, herbes de provence and other flavorful ingredients. I lightly browned the roast at the same time and was already ready to eat. The kitchen was filled with so many wonderful smells. I had never used herbes de provence before but instantly fell in love with the aroma. I’ll definitely be keeping in stock.

Once the wine base reduced it was time to put the roast in the oven for a few hours. This left plenty of time for philosophical talks, rants about life, discovering new shows on Netflix – all while dying to eat the amazing meal we knew was cooking.

Veggies

Finally, it was time to work on the next step so we got started on cutting up the veggies. Here’s a tip for you: Don’t drop most of your mushrooms on the floor. However, the jokes on you mushrooms. I don’t even like you. I didn’t consider this a huge loss in my book but if you do you might want to avoid sharing your ingredients with the floor.

Wine- Marinated Pot Roast

After cooking for another hour it was time to pull out the finished product. Oh. My. Goodness. The roast was literally falling apart as I transferred it to another dish. It was so tender and had great flavor. If you are hesitant about trying anything cooked with wine, don’t worry. It didn’t have a strong taste at all. It was subtle but perfect. The potatoes were the exact consistency I like. My friend had nothing but nice things to say about it as well. I think we both gave this meal an A+. Honestly, it probably could be just as good throwing everything in a crock pot for a few hours, but sometimes there is just something so satisfying about taking your time and knowing you went that little extra mile for the noticeable big flavor.

I would love to know what you think of this recipe! Please leave a comment below when you give it a try. It is sure to be a big hit with your family or your next dinner party.

Recipe of the Month: Chicken Fried Steak

The amazing thing about purchasing a whole/half/quarter cow is the order is so customizable! You get to choose, within reason of course, what cuts you get, how much fat is trimmed, how thick you want your steaks, if you’d rather have more ground beef, etc. It can be overwhelming at first, which is why we want to help as much as we can. We are always available for ideas, tips, and suggestions. If you’re anything like me before I got into this, you have probably had to google what kind of meat to use for a recipe. What’s the difference between certain cuts? Is a Porterhouse and T-Bone steak the same thing?

Did you know you can get your grass-fed round roasts cut into tenderized fillets instead of individual roasts? This opens up many recipe options like the all-time favorite Chicken Fried Steak! Others include philly cheese steaks, pepper steak and rice, fajitas, and grilled round steak. These tenderized fillets are ideal because they require no additional tenderization from the cook (think pounding with a meat mallet – although a great stress release after a bad day). These fillets have been cross-cut tenderized at the butcher and then packaged in groups of two or four steaks. They have great flavor by themselves and are very lean.

Preparation of the Chicken Fried Steaks is easy! Let’s get cooking!

Ingredients:

  • 1 package of tenderized round roast fillets
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/4 cup of milk
  • 2 Cups of seasoned flour (I season with salt, mild paprika or a little cayenne pepper, and lots of pepper)
  • Salt to taste
  • Pepper to taste
  • Canola Oil

IMG_20180804_172957797

To Prepare:

  • Beat the two eggs in a shallow, wide bowl (you are going to dredge the steaks in these bowls so they should be large enough to fit the steak in them) with milk until very well mixed.
  • In a second shallow, wide bowl add the seasoned flour (Instead I used a ziplock baggie to use the good ol’ shake and bake method. This is not recommended, however, as the steaks are thin and flexible and fold in on themselves. I ended up having to work with it a bit)
  • Pat the steaks dry with a paper towel and then season generously with salt and pepper (What’s your preference? More pepper or more salt?)
  • Take the seasoned steak and dredge it in the flour bowl, forcing flour into the meat with your fingers.
  • Remove the steak from the flour bowl and then soak it in the egg mixture.
  • Repeat the flour coating one more time. This is important to get that good thick breading we all like.
  • Put the steak on a rack and repeat this process for all the steaks.
  • Pre-heat a cast iron skillet with approximately 1/2 inch of oil covering the bottom of the skillet.

The Cooking:

  • Once the oil is hot, add a steak or steaks to the frying pan. Be careful not to crowd the steaks, there should be space between each steak in the skillet.
  • Fry over high heat for approximately 2 to 5 minutes per side until the coating is golden brown – be careful not to burn the coating by leaving the steak too long. Flip the steak and cook for half the amount of time on the second side or until golden brown.
  • Remove the steaks to a plate and place in a warmer until ready to eat.
  • These chicken fried steaks should be medium rare to medium. If you want them more well-done then you can place them back in the skillet, and then put the skillet in a 350 degree oven and bake for 15 to 30 minutes.

IMG_20180804_185048992

Grass-Fed Chicken Fried Steak is a great way to serve round steak and it is very fast to prepare once you have mastered the recipe. These steaks are great served alone with mashed potatoes and a salad, This time I went completely southern with it and paired the steak with mashed potatoes/gravy and fried okra and squash. They make great steak sandwiches. We like to have ours on a large hamburger bun, with mustard, pickles, tomatoes, and lettuce. Yum!

Let us know what you think below! Also, share your recipes using round roast fillets.

Two Places at Once: Our Locations Explained

You might be wondering, or even confused, about our process and how we do things at the ranch, especially since you might have noticed I throw out Kansas and Oklahoma a lot. Why multiple locations? Let me explain.

As I have mentioned before in Ranch Day!!, our main ranch (Grant Creek) is in Cedar vale, KS. It is about 1,400 acres of beautiful pastures and creek. We also own some farm land in Carney, OK. Technically, these are all owned by Riverview Property Co., LLC. Riverview is an affiliate company of Marjo Operating Co., Inc., a small oil and gas company out of Tulsa, OK. This is where the blog magic happens. Mark and Brian run ranch operations with the help of a few guys both in Kansas and Oklahoma while I pass on all the information I hope you all enjoy reading. Then there are the other office duties like Accounting that go on at our Tulsa office as well.

All of our cows and bulls live at Grant Creek Ranch and all of the calves start out there. When calves are born, they stay with their mothers for about 6 months. During this time they roam free and are only caught once when they are tagged with ear tags. After this period, the cows are separated into two groups: Those that will be raised for meat and those that will be sold as calves.

Raised for meat

The calves that are kept to raise will go to the ranch in Carney, OK after they have reached 6 months old. The pastures they will graze are mostly Bermuda grass fertilized with nitrogen. This is safe for the cows and the meat and causes the grass to grow extremely fast, giving the calves plenty to eat. Of course there is a weaning period first. The calves are kept in a smaller area only for about a week. They are fed hay and supplemented with protein, similar to what we have to do in the winter. This is an important step because unfortunately this can be a stressful transition for calves and it can make them susceptible to certain health conditions. We want to make sure they are watched closely and kept calm. As you know we treat our cows well so we have never had any issues with their health or well-being. After this transition time, they are released into the pastures to continue grazing and grow.

Our current calves were born in February/March and will go to Carney in September. They will remain until they are about 1 1/2 years old, gaining approximately 3 pounds per day.

Calves to sell

All of our calves go through this similar process. The ones that are selected to sell will be weaned and then taken to Oklahoma City to be sold. It is better to sell them after the weaning process to ensure they do not develop any issues. This means they can be sold for a higher price and at less risk for the buyer. What happens to these calves next is up to the buyer. Some are sent to feed lots, others are probably sent to other pastures. Who knows, some might even be used for therapy. Yes, this is a thing. Read about it.

Delivery and Processing

Because we have farms locally in these locations, we focus on processing and delivery in these areas only. Someday we hope to grow to be able to branch out our business and offer our meat to a larger demographic. The cost of keeping the meat cold during shipping makes this at a challenge at the moment.

We do offer free delivery in Tulsa and can even make arrangements to have the meat processed at a closer location to you to make ordering easier and more convenient, depending on where you are.

Spread the word so we can start reaching more people and make the delivery process easier and more available for everyone!

Recipe of the Month: Smoked Whiskey Bacon Burgers

Happy July! The month of patriotism, fireworks, and summer. Naturally, for this month we’re sticking to a 4th of July classic: Burgers. Perfect for your family gathering before you blow stuff up. This recipe combines good ol’ grass-fed beef with whiskey and bacon…’Merica!

I had actually come across a video from the BBQ Pit Boys a few times and decided to try my own take of their whiskey burger. This was just used as inspiration. I left out and added quite a bit, strayed from their method, and as much as I would’ve liked to be doing this in the woods with the perfect smoker like they do, I stayed on my front porch with my average, tiny smoker (Can you guess what’ll be on my Christmas list this year?). But you know what? There’s nothing whiskey, bacon, and cheese can’t make better.

Ingredients:

  • Seasoning (or any seasoning of your choice)
    • 2 Tablespoons packed brown sugar
    • 1 Tablespoon¬†salt
    • 1 Tablespoon¬†onion powder
    • 1 Tablespoon¬†garlic powder
    • 1 Tablespoon¬†ground mustard
    • 1 Tablespoon¬†smoked paprika (love the smell of this!)
    • 1 Tablespoon¬†ground black pepper
  • 2 Pounds Grant Creek Ranch¬†grass-fed beef (Makes 4 burgers)
  • 2 Tablespoons¬†Worcestershire sauce
  • 4 Tablespoons¬†BBQ sauce
  • Crispy onion strings¬†(Store-bought or make your own!)
  • 1/2 Cup¬†Whiskey
  • 8 Slices¬†Bacon
  • 4 Slices¬†Swiss Cheese

*Disclaimer – These measurements are an estimate. I eye-balled most of it. There’s lots of freedom (pun totally intended) with this recipe.

Make It!

  • First, mix all the seasoning ingredients together. This recipe actually makes quite a bit and you can use as much or as little as you like. I had a lot left over to use for future recipes.
  • Mix some of the seasoning mixture into each 1/2 pound of beef along with a 1/4 of Worcestershire sauce each, and then form your patties. Because grass-fed is leaner, it sometimes helps to add that extra moisture you get from the Worcestershire, even if you can’t pronounce it.
  • If you have rings you can form the patties in, that’s great. If not, you can make one out of aluminum foil, although this step isn’t completely necessary. It just helps to hold everything together, especially when you pour the whiskey on top.
  • Poke holes in your patties and put a layer of brown sugar on top. You can also use more of the seasoning mixture above. I personally would use more brown sugar than I did next time.

Prepped Patties(Please ignore the poor quality of my photos. We’re in a remodeling process and my lighting is not the best)

  • Drizzle a tablespoon of BBQ sauce over each patty. (I forgot this step)
  • Pour a tablespoon of whiskey over each patty.
  • Let sit for at least 30 minutes in the refrigerator.
  • This is the time I used to get my charcoal going for the smoker, fry up some bacon, and make my crispy onion strings.
  • When your smoker is ready to go, put the patties on, close the lid, and wait. Then, go ahead and sneak that shot of whiskey and slice of bacon. No judgement here.
  • I smoked my burgers for about an hour. When I got them out they looked smoky, glazed and beautiful.

Smoked Patties

  • Next, build your burger however you like and pair with your favorite BBQ sides (which I was lacking at the moment).

Smoked Whiskey Bacon Burger

Overall, I thought this burger was pretty delicious and had a very deep smoky flavor. Very moist and cooked perfectly, I will definitely be making this again!

Let me know if you gave it a try in the comments below!

Update on Beef Sales

2018 Grass Fed Beef Sales – Tulsa Area

Our beef will be ready to be picked up from the processor in late December 2018.  The hanging weight should still be the same as discussed in the sales page and the price will still be $3.99/lb hanging weight plus processing. We still have some beef left to sell, so if you are interested in beef for 2018 please take a look at the sales page for details on reserving your beef. There is a form that you can fill out to get in touch with us. We will get in touch with everyone who has reserved beef in about a month to discuss payment of your deposit which will guarantee your beef for 2018.

2019 Grass Fed Beef Sales – Tulsa Area

We are already planning for 2019 beef sales and if there is enough interest we may have beef sales in July 2019 and November 2019. Our normal beef sales time is late in the year, but we understand that some people may want beef before this date. If you are interested in beef for either date in 2019 then please fill out the form on the sales page and in the comments section let us know that you are interested in either summer or winter 2019 beef purchase.

Update on Calf Purchases – Oklahoma City Area

We have for sale 1 year old weaned calves that have had one round of shots and are eating out of a trough. These calves are located at our Carney, Oklahoma pre-conditioning facility and may be delivered from here if you are interested. If you are interested in purchasing these calves please fill out the form on the sales page and let us know. We will then be in touch with you to arrange a time for you to take a look at the calves and to discuss pricing and delivery of the calves.

Calves for Purchase

 

Bone up on Health: Grass-fed Beef and the Diets of Today.

How grass-fed fits into your lifestyle

Millennials tend to get a lot of heat these days for the changing times. Arguments between the new and old generations can go on for days, but one change I think everyone can get on board with is the desire to eat better and maintain a healthier lifestyle. People want to know where their food comes from, how the animals are treated, what it consists of. We are breaking away from the quick convenience of processed foods and going back to the diets of our ancestors.

What does this really have to do with grass fed beef? Everything! Many popular diets that have garnered more attention in the past years focus on whole foods, healthy fats, grains, the list goes on. You may have heard of some of these or even tried one:

  • Ketogenic (Keto)
  • Paleoliothic (Paleo)
  • Whole30
  • Mediterranean Diet

The Benefits

Natural grass-fed meat is a preferred staple of any diet consisting of “real” foods. I cannot claim that health is the number one motivation behind our practices as a company and we are definitely not in the health food business, however I, as the author of this blog, can say that it is a huge reason for me personally to be involved and why it is so easy for me to talk about. We found an interesting article in¬†The Furrow that referenced a study done by Stone Barns Center regarding the health benefits of grass-fed beef

According to the study grass-fed beef has been shown to have an increased concentration of conjugated linoleic acids (CLA’s) which is basically a group of important Omega 3 and Omega 6 fatty acids that can only be found in certain natural foods.¬† This can supposedly contribute to reduced risks of diseases such as high cholesterol, cancer, heart disease and may also contain high levels of antioxidants which are very beneficial.

There’s even more

I think that’s a start for a pretty strong case for grass-fed beef, but what about everything left over? Well, another diet that has recently surfaced in popularity and has caused me to do even more research is the bone-broth diet. It consists of drinking bone broth made from the bones of nutritious grass-fed animals. A big reason for this is the collagen that can only be found in bones. It helps with healthy skin and joints, among other benefits that we agree sound amazing.

Diets aside, people have been making their own broth probably since the beginning of time, so saving the bones once these cows have been butchered is nothing new. People have the option to keep the bones from their cow purchase but many opt out. Instead of them going to waste we want to start keeping these so they can be available to our customers, especially when it’s not time for a new cow. Whether for diet or dog toy purposes we’ll throw you a bone ūüėČ

Drop us a line to request some bones or to let us know what you like to use them for!

 

Why Grass-Fed Beef?

What makes Grant Creek Ranch Beef better than what you can get in the grocery store? There are many differences and we will discuss a few of the them in this post. Grant Creek Ranch Beef is from Angus cross cattle.  These cattle have been specifically bred to produce great taste from grass-fed animals.  This cross breed also produces cuts of meat that are restaurant quality; cuts of meat that you would be proud to serve to your dinner guests.  These animals are raised in a sustainable fashion: born in a pasture and allowed to roam freely until weaning time.  They are weaned at our preconditioning facility in Carney, Oklahoma.  Here they can be observed on a daily basis to make sure they are not under any undue stress.  Once weaned they are turned out onto our pastures in Oklahoma where they eat a mix of native and Bermuda grass.  During the winter they are supplemented with native or Bermuda grass hay and protein cubes, as they continue to forage in a pasture unconfined, through to the finishing process.

At Grant Creek Ranch our cow herd is a closed herd.  We are not bringing in new cows unless we are sure they are disease-free.  Because our herd is closed, the animal health is excellent and disease is held to a minimum. As a result we are only handling the cattle a couple of times a year (spring and summer) and the rest of the time they are busy grazing away on our pastures.

We are not interested in rapid weight gain or incredible size, therefore neither growth hormones nor steroids are ever used. This is because our customers want and expect naturally-raised, high-quality beef worth every penny.

To sum this up in one simple word: Flavor. Our grass-fed process results in some of the most tender and flavorful meat on the market. Why would you want anything else?

We are currently delivering sides of beef for no charge in the Tulsa area.  It is also for sale in the Wichita, Oklahoma City, Bartlesville, and Stillwater Areas (Delivery available for a small fee). Please check out our For Sale page for more information.

Once your try our meat you will never want to buy store-bought beef again!

Cooking Instructions

More Details about our Beef

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