Recipe of the Month: Not your Caveman’s Chili!

Happy May 1st! Boy, are you in for a treat. From now on we will be sharing one new recipe a month to really give you some ideas on what to use your grass-fed beef for.

We are so excited for the warmer weather we’re getting and all the other wonderful things Spring brings (try saying that 3 times fast). So at start of grilling season why am I reverting back to Winter with a chili recipe!?

Bear with me y’all. This is the best chili, and my personal favorite. In fact, I literally have all the ingredients sitting on my counter at this moment so I can get a pot going once I get home. I don’t know who came up with the rule that chili and soups are Winter foods only but after you try this you’ll ignore that just like I do. Plus this recipe mostly uses a slow cooker, reducing time at the stove and ultimately the added heat of cooking, which of course we don’t want in these temps. Just put it all together and forget about it for a couple hours!

We love all carnivorous ways of eating and plan on incorporating all sorts of recipes for any type of diet involving meat. This particular recipe happens to be keto-friendly. For those unfamiliar with the term it translates to “low-carb deliciousness.” OK, not really, but it might as well. That’s right, this recipe is low-carb which means it doesn’t contain beans and other high-carb foods. That may seem crazy for a chili but I promise you won’t even notice. Besides, it is something you can easily modify!

First, I have to give credit where credit is due. This is not my own recipe. I’ve borrowed it from http://www.ruled.me

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 pounds stew meat (or 1 pound stew and 1 pound ground)
  • 1 medium onion
  • 1 medium green pepper
  • 1 cup beef broth
  • 1/3 cup tomato paste
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons cumin
  • 2 teaspoons Red Boat Fish Sauce
  • 2 teaspoons minced garlic
  • 2 teaspoons paprika
  • 1 teaspoon oregano
  • 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon worcestershire sauce
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • *Optional: 1 cup coffee for more watery chili

A few notes:

  • You do want stew AND ground beef, however you can either buy a pound of ground beef or make your own using a food processor or meat grinder.
  • I have personally never used the fish sauce. I have read that Red Boat is the best brand and I cannot find that in my local stores, but I still thought the chili had great flavor.
  • I have also never tried the coffee trick. I like my chili thick!
  • This chili does have a little kick to it but is not extremely spicy. You can definitely cut back on the chili powder or cayenne for a milder flavor.

LET’S MAKE IT!

  • Grind half your stew meat (if doing this on your own), prep the veggies, and get your spices gathered and ready.
  • To make the sauce combine the beef broth, tomato paste, soy sauce, chili powder, cumin, fish sauce (optional), minced garlic, paprika, oregano, cayenne pepper, worcestershire sauce, and coffee (optional). Set aside for later use.
  • In a pan bring 2 Tbsp. olive oil to its smoking point then add the stew meat to the pan. As it cooks you can pour the excess juice into your slow cooker. Cook until browned and transfer to the slow cooker.
  • Next, add the ground beef to the pan and season with the salt and pepper. When this is finished you’ll add it to the slow cooker as well.
  • In the same pan, cook your chopped green pepper and onion until translucent then add to the slow cooker.
  • Remember that sauce you made in the beginning? Guess where you’re adding it…Stir everything together in the slow cooker and let simmer on high for 2 1/2 hours.
  • When the time is up, take the lid off and let the sauce reduce for 20-30 minutes.
  • Serve! You can add your favorite garnishes such as cheese, onions.

Makes about 4 servings, each serving coming out to about 398 Calories, 17.8g Fat, 5.3g Net Carbs (total carbs minus the fiber), and 51.8g Protein.

MODIFICATIONS;

The ground beef in this recipe is meant to provide a bean-like texture, however if you do not have any dietary restrictions you can definitely add any sort of beans or veggies you may want!

Let us know in the comments if you tried this chili and what you thought! Also, share with us your own recipe ideas. You may even see it featured as a Recipe of the Month someday!

 

 

Bone up on Health: Grass-fed Beef and the Diets of Today.

How grass-fed fits into your lifestyle

Millennials tend to get a lot of heat these days for the changing times. Arguments between the new and old generations can go on for days, but one change I think everyone can get on board with is the desire to eat better and maintain a healthier lifestyle. People want to know where their food comes from, how the animals are treated, what it consists of. We are breaking away from the quick convenience of processed foods and going back to the diets of our ancestors.

What does this really have to do with grass fed beef? Everything! Many popular diets that have garnered more attention in the past years focus on whole foods, healthy fats, grains, the list goes on. You may have heard of some of these or even tried one:

  • Ketogenic (Keto)
  • Paleoliothic (Paleo)
  • Whole30
  • Mediterranean Diet

The Benefits

Natural grass-fed meat is a preferred staple of any diet consisting of “real” foods. I cannot claim that health is the number one motivation behind our practices as a company and we are definitely not in the health food business, however I, as the author of this blog, can say that it is a huge reason for me personally to be involved and why it is so easy for me to talk about. We found an interesting article in The Furrow that referenced a study done by Stone Barns Center regarding the health benefits of grass-fed beef

According to the study grass-fed beef has been shown to have an increased concentration of conjugated linoleic acids (CLA’s) which is basically a group of important Omega 3 and Omega 6 fatty acids that can only be found in certain natural foods.  This can supposedly contribute to reduced risks of diseases such as high cholesterol, cancer, heart disease and may also contain high levels of antioxidants which are very beneficial.

There’s even more

I think that’s a start for a pretty strong case for grass-fed beef, but what about everything left over? Well, another diet that has recently surfaced in popularity and has caused me to do even more research is the bone-broth diet. It consists of drinking bone broth made from the bones of nutritious grass-fed animals. A big reason for this is the collagen that can only be found in bones. It helps with healthy skin and joints, among other benefits that we agree sound amazing.

Diets aside, people have been making their own broth probably since the beginning of time, so saving the bones once these cows have been butchered is nothing new. People have the option to keep the bones from their cow purchase but many opt out. Instead of them going to waste we want to start keeping these so they can be available to our customers, especially when it’s not time for a new cow. Whether for diet or dog toy purposes we’ll throw you a bone 😉

Drop us a line to request some bones or to let us know what you like to use them for!